Hein & History: Thurgood Marshall confirmed as Supreme Court Justice

Hein & History jstanley

On August 30th, 1967 Thurgood Marshall was confirmed as a Supreme Court Justice, becoming the first African American to hold the title.

Thurgood-marshall-2From a young age, Marshall seemed destined for a place in the American justice system. His parents instilled in him an appreciation for the Constitution, a feeling that was reinforced by his schoolteachers, who forced him to read the document as punishment for his misbehavior. After graduating from Lincoln University in 1930, Marshall sought admission to the University of Maryland School of Law, but was turned away because of the school’s segregation policy, which effectively forbade blacks from studying with whites. Instead, Marshall attended Howard University Law School, from which he graduated magna cum laude in 1933.

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Hein & History: War In Iraq Begins

Hein & History jstanley

On this day in 2003, the United States, along with coalition forces primarily from the United Kingdom, initiated war on Iraq. President Bush addressed the American people from the Oval Office at 10:10 PM.

20030319-17_address2-250h“At this hour, American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger.

On my orders, coalition forces have begun striking selected targets of military importance to undermine Saddam Hussein’s ability to wage war. These are opening stages of what will be a broad and concerted campaign. More than 35 countries are giving crucial support — from the use of naval and air bases,

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Hein & History: Twain publishes The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Hein & History jstanley

On February 18, 1885 Mark Twain published his famous novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in the United States.

Huckleberry_Finn_CoverThis controversial story follows the journey of Huck and his friend Jim, a runaway slave, down the Mississippi River on a raft. Jim runs away because he is about to be sold and separated from his wife and children, and Huck goes with him to help him get to Ohio and freedom. Huck narrates the story in his distinctive voice, offering colorful descriptions of the people and places they encounter along the way. The most striking part of the book is its satirical look at racism, religion and other social attitudes of the time.

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Hein & History: The 11th Hour of the 11th Day of the 11th Month

Hein & History jstanley

At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 World War I, commonly known as the Great War, comes to an end.

Europe-1919-2

 

At 5 a.m. that morning, Germany, bereft of manpower and supplies and faced with imminent invasion, signed an armistice agreement with the Allies in a railroad car outside Compiégne, France. The First World War left nine million soldiers dead and 21 million wounded, with Germany, Russia, Austria-Hungary, France, and Great Britain each losing nearly a million or more lives. In addition, at least five million civilians died from disease, starvation, or exposure. More from History.com »

 

 

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Hein & History | August 24, 1954: Congress passes Communist Control Act

Hein & History jstanley

On August 24, 1954, President Dwight Eisenhower signed legislation outlawing the Communist Party of the United States.

195lsxzgbs2hrjpgThe Communist Control Act was passed by Congress in response to the growing anti communist feelings in the United States. Though full of ominous language, many found the purpose of the act unclear.

In 1954, the Red Scare still raged in the United States. Although Senator Joseph McCarthy, the most famous of the “red hunters” in America, had been disgraced earlier in the summer of 1954 when he tried to prove that communists were in the U.S. Army, most Americans still believed that communists were at work in their country. Responding to this fear,

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Hein & History | August 18 1920: Woman suffrage amendment ratified

Hein & History jstanley

woman7From History.com:

On August 18, 1920 the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, guaranteeing women the right to vote, is ratified by Tennessee, giving it the two-thirds majority of state ratification necessary to make it the law of the land. The amendment was the culmination of more than 70 years of struggle by woman suffragists. Its two sections read simply: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex” and “Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” 

America’s woman suffrage movement was founded in the mid 19th century by women who had become politically active through their work in the abolitionist and temperance movements.

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Hein & History

Hein & History jstanley

August 4, 2014 marks the centenary of Britain’s declaration of war on Germany. To many, this marks the beginning of the first World War, or the Great War.

From History.com:

“In late June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Bosnia. An escalation of threats and mobilization orders followed the incident, leading by mid-August to the outbreak of World War I, which pitted Germany, Austria-Hungary and the Ottoman Empire (the so-called Central Powers) against Great Britain, France, Russia, Italy and Japan (the Allied Powers). The Allies were joined after 1917 by the United States. The four years of the Great War–as it was then known–saw unprecedented levels of carnage and destruction,

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