And Justice for All

2010, Criminal Justice, Criminal Law and Procedure, Political Science admin

By: William M. Kunstler

In this work, Kunstler explores ten criminal trials, including the cases of Mary Surrat, Alger Hiss, the Rosenbergs, and Sacco and Vanzetti, illuminating for the reader the overwhelming influence of societal attitudes working against the defendants in each case within a particular point in history. Inasmuch as our legal system wishes to preserve the idea of “innocent until proven guilty,” Kunstler provides a sound argument for the unfortunate effect of society’s perception on the outcome of many of the most famous criminal trials in history. And Justice for All would be a wonderful addition to any trials collection.

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Originally Published: Dobbs Ferry;

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Confidence in the Courtroom

2010, Criminal Law and Procedure, Judicial Administration admin

Understanding the Federal Rules of Evidence
By: James Headley and Corey Osborn

Confidence in the Courtroom is a practical guide to understanding the federal rules of evidence and how they are applied. Lawyers have a responsibility to introduce evidence that helps their client and to prevent opponents from introducing evidence that is improper. The judge, the person determining what evidence is admitted and what evidence is not, uses legal reasoning to apply the rules of evidence to the facts of the case. Understanding how legal professionals think and they way they analyze problems will help readers communicate effectively with the judge and get the evidentiary rulings they want.

This work is designed to introduce the process of legal reasoning and the basic principles of evidence to anyone preparing for trial.

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JUST PUBLISHED – Confidence in the Courtroom

2010, Criminal Law and Procedure, Judicial Administration admin

Understanding the Federal Rules of Evidence
By: James Headley and Corey Osborn
Confidence in the Courtroom is a practical guide to understanding the federal rules of evidence and how they are applied. Lawyers have a responsibility to introduce evidence that helps their client and to prevent opponents from introducing evidence that is improper. The judge, the person determining what evidence is admitted and what evidence is not, uses legal reasoning to apply the rules of evidence to the facts of the case. Understanding how legal professionals think and the way they analyze problems will help readers communicate effectively with the judge and get the evidentiary rulings they want.

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Comparative Criminal Procedure

2010, Comparative Law, Criminal Law and Procedure admin

History, Process and Case Studies
By: Raneta Lawson Mack
This work takes readers one step further than other texts on the market. Most other comparative works in the area of criminal justice are primarily dedicated to the issue of reforming criminal procedure. This work, on the other hand, forgoes a reform-oriented analysis in favor of clarifying the criminal process in other countries, as they exist today. Professor Mack provides readers with case studies documenting how the processes actually unfold within five other jurisdictions: France, Russia, Spain, Germany, and England.
Comparative Criminal Procedure has three primary functions:
  • Offer readers a deeper look into criminal procedure
  • Address the features of the criminal justice system post-September 11,

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Digital Evidence in the Courtroom

2010, Computers/Technology, Criminal Law and Procedure, Hein's Electronic Documents Reprint Series admin

A Guide for Law Enforcement and Prosecutors
National Institute of Justice
Now essential to modern life, computers have become increasingly important to criminals who steal information, commit fraud, and stalk victims online. Even if a crime was not committed online, law enforcement may discover critical evidence from an offender’s digital media. For this evidence to be admissible, police must demonstrate proper collection and handling. This work was prepared in an effort to help navigate this complex process.
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Originally Published: Washington, D.C.; Department of Justice;

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And Justice for All

2010, Criminal Justice, Criminal Law and Procedure, Political Science admin

By: William M. Kunstler
Considered by many to be a flamboyant radical, William M. Kunstler defended many controversial clients, including Jack Ruby, Abbie Hoffman, and the “Chicago Seven.” Throughout his career, Kunstler believed that fixed preconceptions of a community could, in too many instances, contribute more to the outcome of criminal trials than the quantity or quality of the evidence could. The emphasis on due process of law as the basic guarantee of our liberties, so often voiced by courts and lawyers, and reasonably true in ordinary trials, is secondary where prejudice prevails. In this work, Kunstler provides a sound argument for the unfortunate effect of society’s perception on the outcome of many of the most famous criminal trials in history.

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Digital Evidence in the Courtroom

2010, Computers/Technology, Criminal Law and Procedure, Hein's Electronic Documents Reprint Series admin

A Guide for Law Enforcement and Prosecutors

Now essential to modern life, computers have also become increasingly important to criminals, who steal information, commit fraud, and stalk victims online. Even if a crime was not committed online, law enforcement may discover critical evidence from offenders’ digital media. For this evidence to be admissible, however, police must demonstrate proper collection and handling. In the courtroom, prosecutors must overcome the twin barriers of skepticism and lack of technical understanding. To help navigate this complex process, the National Institute of Justice’s technical working group of national experts prepared this special report.

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Original Published: Washington,

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Comparative Criminal Procedure

2010, Comparative Law, Criminal Law and Procedure admin

History, Processes and Case Studies
By: Raneta Lawson Mack

Most comparative works in the area of criminal justice are primarily dedicated to the issue of reforming criminal procedure. This work, takes readers one step further, forgoing a reform-oriented analysis in favor of clarifying the criminal process in other countries, as they exist today. Comparative Criminal Procedure has three primary functions:

  • Offer readers a deeper look into criminal procedure
  • Address the feature of the criminal justice system post-September 11, 2001
  • Address the move toward uniform criminal procedure
  • This work is unique and distinctive, as it provides readers with a retrospective launching point from which to understand and compare current processes.

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September 11 Detainees

2010, Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Criminal Law and Procedure, Hein's Electronic Documents Reprint Series, Immigration admin

A Review of the Treatment of Aliens Held on Immigration Charges in Connection with the Investigation of the September 11 Attacks
Hein’s Electronic Documents Reprint Series, #11

Shortly after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the U.S. Attorney General directed the FBI and other federal law enforcement personnel to use “every available law enforcement tool” to arrest persons participating in, or lending support to, terrorist activities. Within two months, authorities had detained at least 1,200 citizens and aliens nationwide. While some were questioned and released without charge, many were arrested for violating federal immigration law. This work reviews the allegations that began to arise in the media that detainees were being mistreated,

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The Law of the International Criminal Court

2010, Criminal Law and Procedure, International Law admin

By: Young Sok Kim

Kim’s work offers a clear and in-depth look into the law, procedures, composition and authority of the International Criminal Court. It also aims to bridge the gap between the unfavorable position of those states refusing to ratify the Court’s treaty, including the United States and Israel, with the stance of a large majority of other governments desiring to establish a permanent International Criminal Court. Kim’s knowledge and first-hand experience in shaping the ICC makes this a necessary addition to any international law collection!

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Published: Buffalo; William S.

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